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We are excited for the opportunity to welcome back our patients and staff! With everyone's safety in mind during this unusual time, we have taken great care in implementing a comprehensive set of new protocols to ensure the lowest possible risk of disease transmission that follows infection control recommendations made by the American Dental Association (ADA), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). A comprehensive list of changes to our office can be found here.

We look forward to seeing everyone again and are happy to answer any questions you may have about the steps we take to keep you, and every patient, safe in our practice.

COVID-19 News and Updates
How to Manage the Pain of a Cracked Tooth Until We Can Correct It
Posted on 7/7/2020 by office
How to Manage the Pain of a Cracked Tooth Until We Can Correct ItFor many people, a cracked tooth is not a dental emergency. Most people can take the pain and discomfort for a while until the cracked tooth has been fixed. However, you might find that the pain has become too much, and you cannot see us immediately. In such a case, you will need to relieve the pain, albeit temporarily, so that you can get things done. These are a few ways you can do this.

Oral Pain Medicine


Taking some over-the-counter medication can help you out and ease some of the pain. You can use ibuprofen or acetaminophen as a quick way to gain relief. It's essential that when taking these medications, you stay within the recommended dosage.

Sleeping with Your Head Elevated


When a tooth cracks, the nerve is often exposed, which can lead to inflammation and a lot of sensitivity. Normal sleeping positions mean that there might be a lot of blood pumping to the mouth, which can amplify the pain. You can relieve the pain by relieving the pressure, which can be done by elevating your head.

Saltwater Rinse


Since the last thing we'd want is for the cracked tooth to get an infection, it's always prudent to rinse the tooth in question with some saltwater. When you add salt to warm water, it acts as an antibiotic that neutralizes the bacteria in the mouth, making the tooth much less likely to experience spikes in pain level. This process should be repeated two to three times every day, just to be safe.

Although these solutions work well enough, it is not a good, let alone permanent, solution. Come in and see us as soon as you can so that we can accurately assess the damage and fix the problem before it becomes worse.